HO41 …item 1.. ~ by seeker401 on May 2, 2013 …item 2.. Sex ‘superbug’ feared to be ‘more infectious than AIDS’ — it could become untreatable by 2015 (6 May 2013) …

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HO41 …item 1.. ~ by seeker401 on May 2, 2013 …item 2.. Sex ‘superbug’ feared to be ‘more infectious than AIDS’ — it could become untreatable by 2015 (6 May 2013) …
Heart attack symptoms

Image by marsmet553
This gonorrhea strain, HO41, was discovered in Japan two years ago in a 31-year-old female sex worker who had been screened in 2009. The bacteria has since been found in Hawaii, California and Norway.
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…..item 1)…. Sex superbug could be ‘Worse than AIDS’ …

… seeker401.wordpress.com … seeker401.wordpress.com/

follow the money

"It has to start somewhere. It has to start sometime. What better place than here? What better time than now?"
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img code photo … gonorrhea

seeker401.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/gonorrhea.jpg?w=245…

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www.cnbc.com/id/100685883

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seeker401.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/sex-superbug-could-be-…

An antibiotic-resistant strain of gonorrhea—now considered a superbug—has some analysts saying that the bacteria’s effects could match those of AIDS.

“This might be a lot worse than AIDS in the short run because the bacteria is more aggressive and will affect more people quickly,” said Alan Christianson, a doctor of naturopathic medicine.

Even though nearly 30 million people have died from AIDS related causes worldwide, Christianson believes the effect of the gonorrhea bacteria is more direct.

“Getting gonorrhea from this strain might put someone into septic shock and death in a matter of days,” Christianson said. “This is very dangerous.”

“It’s an emergency situation,” said William Smith, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors. “As time moves on, it’s getting more hazardous.”

This gonorrhea strain, HO41, was discovered in Japan two years ago in a 31-year-old female sex worker who had been screened in 2009. The bacteria has since been found in Hawaii, California and Norway.

Because it resists current antibiotic treatment, the strain has been placed in the superbug category with other resistant bacteria, such as MRSA and CRE. These superbugs kill about half the people they attack, and nearly one in 20 hospital patients become infected with one, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Though no deaths from HO41 have been reported, efforts to combat it must continue, Smith said.

“We have to keep beating the drum on this,” he said. “The potential for disaster is great.”

Gonorrhea is transmitted through unprotected sexual contact. Untreated, the disease can cause a number of health complications in women, including infertility. In men, the disease can be very painful and lead to sterility. It can also trigger other life-threatening illnesses, including heart infections.

Gonorrhea can be hard to detect. It often shows no symptoms in about half of women and in about 5 percent of men. Gonorrhea infection rates were at historic lows until two years ago, according to the CDC.

“That’s what’s kind of scary about this,” Smith said. “We are at lows in terms of infections, but this strain is a very tricky bug and we don’t have anything medically to fight it right now.”

Avoiding the disease completely is the best course, experts said.

“People need to practice safe sex, like always,” Christianson said. “Anyone beginning a new relationship should get tested along with their partner. The way gonorrhea works, not everyone knows they have it. And with this new strain it’s even more important than ever to find out. “

All superbugs must be dealt with before it’s too late, he said.

“This is a disaster just waiting to happen,” Christianson said. “It’s time to do something about it before it explodes. “These superbugs, including the gonorrhea strain, are a health threat. We need to move now before it gets out of hand.”

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“antibiotic-resistant strain of gonorrhea—now considered a superbug”

“this strain might put someone into septic shock and death in a matter of days,”

the fuck..dead in a few days??

“the disease can cause a number of health complications in women, including infertility. In men, the disease can be very painful and lead to sterility.”

use a condom?

401

~ by seeker401 on May 2, 2013.

Posted in Japan, Norway, USA, World News
Tags: health, medicine

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…..item 2)…. Sex ‘superbug’ feared to be ‘more infectious than AIDS’ discovered in Hawaii …

… Mail Online – Daily Mail … www.dailymail.co.uk/news

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER
PUBLISHED: 10:58 EST, 5 May 2013 | UPDATED: 03:38 EST, 6 May 2013

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2319818/Sex-superbug-fea…

Health officials are warning that two cases of a so-called ‘sex superbug’ have been confirmed in Hawaii.

Hawaii News Now reports that the ‘sex superbug’ is a resistant strain of gonorrhea.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has asked Congress for million to find a new antibiotic to treat the drug-resistant strain of the disease. The first case in the nation was identified in a young woman in Hawaii in May 2011.
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img code photo … ‘sex superbug’ have been confirmed in Hawaii

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/05/05/article-2319818-19A279…

Health officials are warning that two cases of a so-called ‘sex superbug’ have been confirmed in Hawaii

Photo credit: none listed
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The ‘sex superbug’ called H041 was first discovered in Japan in 2011. It spread to Hawaii, and has now surfaced in California and Norway.

Peter Whiticir with the State Department of Health says advisories have been sent to physicians and health care providers around Hawaii to be on the lookout for the resistant strain of gonorrhea.

Doctors are warning that an antibiotic-resistant strain of gonorrhoea, now considered a superbug, has the potential to be as deadly as the AIDS virus.

Gonorrhea is the second most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection in North America.

‘This might be a lot worse than AIDS in the short run because the bacteria is more aggressive and will affect more people quickly,’ Alan Christianson, a doctor of naturopathic medicine told CNBC.

Nearly 30 million people have died from AIDS related causes worldwide, but Christianson believes the effect of the gonorrhea bacteria is more direct.

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‘Getting gonorrhea from this strain might put someone into septic shock and death in a matter of days,’ Christianson said. ‘This is very dangerous.’

In a briefing on Capitol Hill last week, William Smith, executive director of the National Coalition for STD Directors, urged Congress to target nearly million in immediate funding to help find an antibiotic for HO41 and to conduct an education and public awareness campaign.
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img code photo … The ‘superbug’ was first discovered in Japan

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/05/05/article-2319818-19A279…

The ‘superbug’ was first discovered in Japan and some health officials have said it could rival AIDS

Carolina Biological Supply Co / Visuals Unlimited / Corbis

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Although no deaths from HO41 have been reported as yet, experts say avoiding the disease completely is the best course of action.

‘People need to practice safe sex, like always,’ Christianson said. ‘Anyone beginning a new relationship should get tested along with their partner.

‘The way gonorrhea works, not everyone knows they have it. And with this new strain it’s even more important than ever to find out.’

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease that has been known since medieval times. Sometimes known as ‘the clap,’ the infection can result in painful sores and genital discharge, and is associated with ectopic pregnancies and sterility in both men and women.

Left untreated, gonorrhea can lead to a host of complications including pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and blood stream infections.

It also raises the risk for HIV because the lesions permit the AIDS-causing virus easier access to the bloodstream.

Gonorrhea is especially common among people between the ages of 15 and 24.

The disease became curable in the 1940s when penicillin and other antibiotics were introduced. Since then, the medical world has created more new drugs that killed the ever-mutating gonorrhea bacteria.
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img code photo … very real prospect that all types of gonorrhea will soon become untreatable

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/05/05/article-2319818-19A279…

Health officials said there is the very real prospect that all types of gonorrhea will soon become untreatable

Masterfile / Radius Images

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On a state-by-state basis, pockets of the U.S. are seeing giant spikes in the disease. Utah saw a 74 percent rise in gonorrhea cases in 2012, with the trend continuing into the first few months of this year.

In Minnesota, cases rose 35 percent in 2012, according to the state’s department of health, and according to the latest statistics from the CDC, ‘During 2010–2011, 61% (31/51) of states, plus the District of Columbia, reported an increase in gonorrhea rates.’

Cephalosporin, the last available class of antibiotics recommended for the treatment of gonorrhea, has been failing worldwide and there is the very real prospect that all types of gonorrhea will soon become untreatable.

Professor Cathy Ison, head of the National Reference Laboratory for Gonorrhoea in the U.K. told the BBC last week: ‘There is a possibility that if we don’t do something then it could become untreatable by 2015.’

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125/365: 2006-2007
Heart attack symptoms

Image by bloody marty mix
Sunday, 28 September 2008.

40 Years in 40 Days [ view the entire set ]
An examination and remembrance of a life at 40.

For the 40 days leading up to my 40th birthday, I intend to use my 365 Days project to document and remember my life and lay bare what defines me. 40 years, 40 qualities, 40 days.

Year 39: 2006-2007

At the beginning of October, 2006, Kurt and I were beside ourselves with excitement. Kurt’s team, the Cardinals, and my team, the Tigers, would meet in the World Series. We joked about how romantic and perfect it was, and we trash-talked each other’s teams, gently ribbing and teasing when someone made an error or struck out.

I would miss part of that series, however, because I was in the hospital. I’d had an episode of heart palpitations while driving to work. I’d always had occasional palpitations, even as a teenager, but they were always over just as soon as they’d begun. This time, they didn’t stop. I felt my field of vision closing in front of me, so I pulled over to the side of the road, sure I was going to pass out. I thought, you’ve got to be kidding me. This is how I’m going to go? Sitting by the side of the highway during the morning commute to my soulless corporate cubicle? And then it stopped. I sat there for a minute, just breathing and making sure that it really was over, then got back on the road and drove to my office. When I got there, I told my boss what had happened, and that I needed to go to the hospital to get checked out.

When I walked into the emergency room and told them that I thought I was having heart trouble, they didn’t even bother writing my name down before whisking me back into the treatment area. They hooked me up to every conceivable machine, did a CT scan, and took vials of blood to test. Nothing turned up. They suspected it was a combination of stress, lack of sleep, and having just finished a course of prescription decongestants, but they kept me overnight for observations anyway. They set me up in a room in the cardiac wing with wires hanging from my chest and abdomen. Nurses down the hall monitored my heart rate and blood pressure. The next morning, they did an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound). Still nothing. It was time to face facts, the doctor said. I was too stressed. I needed to chill out. I rolled my eyes. There was no way that was going to happen. In addition to the stressful job, I had also begun taking design and metalworking classes to indulge my interest in jewelry design. My schedule wasn’t going to be getting any easier for months. Then, as if to mock his own admonition to relax, he informed me that the CT scan had turned up a mysterious mass on my liver. And thus began my weird health odyssey.

The doctors suspected that the mass on my liver was a giant hemangioma (basically a big, blood-filled, internal birthmark), but they needed to do an MRI to be sure. The MRI confirmed the diagnosis. I had a very large blood-filled sac on my liver, and if it broke open, I could die. Unfortunately, the surgery to remove it would be just as likely to kill me, so my best option was to simply make sure I never got hit really hard in the liver. Well, OK.

The MRI, in turn, had turned up something looking suspiciously like gall stones. I was immediately scheduled for a consultation with a gastrointestinal surgeon. The surgeon was iffy on whether or not to remove the gall bladder. If I didn’t want kids, he said, it was a no brainer: leave it in. If I had any plans to get pregnant in the future, then it was a bit more complicated. If I had a gallstone attack while pregnant, it could be both excruciating and dangerous, but, he noted, also highly unlikely. I was having some symptoms that were somewhat consistent with gall stones, but he felt they were likely something more pedestrian, like IBS. He shoved me along to a gastroenterologist.

The gastroenterologist (who for all the world looked exactly like a guy I once had a huge crush on) decided he’d better do a colonoscopy and endoscopy. I reported for "duty" and just as the doctor (who, did I mention, looked exactly like a guy I once had a huge crush on?) sat down to go to work, I gratefully slipped under the anesthesia. When I awoke, I had a vague memory of choking on something, and nothing else. Kurt stayed at my bedside while I slowly came out of the fog, breaking wind like a frat boy at a Mexican rodeo. Now that’s love, I thought. The -oscopies didn’t turn up anything, either, and so I walked away from my medical odyssey with nothing but a smaller bank account and a paranoid desire that nobody ever punch me in the liver.

That was not to be the end of my trials and tribulations, though. In late July, shortly before my brother was to come to Chicago for a visit, my apartment was invaded by bird mites. The closet in my bedroom featured a mysterious portal to the outside. It had been boarded up loosely and, other than some idle speculation as to what its original purpose was, I didn’t think much about it. That spring, some pigeons had begun nesting there, and when the babies hatched it set up such a ruckus that I couldn’t sleep whenever they were awake. I anxiously awaited the day the babies would leave the nest. Unfortunately, when they did, the mites that had been feeding on them, poured into the house through the portal in search of other food. They found me.

The next month was hell. Pest control could do nothing to stop them. Despite them having told me that they wouldn’t be interested in biting me because I was not a bird, my body was covered, head to toe, with painful welts. I began to research the problem on the internet, and what I uncovered filled me with horror and hopelessness. Bird mites are notoriously hard to get rid of, seem almost random in their choice of target (often leaving others in the same house untouched), and impervious to most pest control chemicals. Their life cycle can be rapid, reproducing and multiplying after just days, or they can adjust to sub-optimal environments by slowing their life cycle. I felt trapped and doomed, and I needed to get out, so I just walked away. I took myself and the cats and some clothing (dryer heat is one of the few things that kills the mites outright) and left the apartment and almost everything I owned. I got the cats cleaned up at the vet, and then moved in with Don W., an old roommate and friend of mine from college. I got in the shower with my clothes on, stripped down in the hot water, put my clothes in a garbage bag, and enjoyed the feeling of being safe once again. I lived with Don W. for the next three months, until I was able to get a short-term lease on a furnished apartment near work. I was planning to move to Kentucky to be with Kurt in January.

Kurt, meanwhile, had plans of his own. My birthday happened to fall on Homecoming weekend that year, and he had something special in mind for a birthday gift. On Friday night (the night before my birthday), as we were getting into our sleeping bags in the tent, Kurt asked me to wait a moment before going to sleep. He had something he wanted to show me. He turned around and fumbled around in his bag in the corner of the tent. When he turned back to me, he was holding out a small white box, opened to reveal a ring. He put it in my hands and said, "I don’t want to live another day having to introduce you as just my girlfriend." We cried and laughed and hugged until our eyes grew too droopy to see clearly, then snuggled back down into our sleeping bags and fell asleep.

Who am I?

I am moderately healthy, actually.

By all rights, I should be a complete wreck. The genetic odds are stacked against me: diabetes, heart disease, cancer, mental illness. The lifestyle odds are stacked against me. I’m fat and have spent many years abusing the hell out of body. And yet, I seem to have remained mostly untouched by the worst of what should have come to me by now. I’m probably living on borrowed time, but for now, it seems to be working.

I credit the generous application of bacon.

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Ein Kommentar zu “HO41 …item 1.. ~ by seeker401 on May 2, 2013 …item 2.. Sex ‘superbug’ feared to be ‘more infectious than AIDS’ — it could become untreatable by 2015 (6 May 2013) …

  1. mitchdcba Autor des Beitrags

    gallstones treatment

    If you have gallstones, I suggest you try any natural methods to get rid of your gallstones and save your gallbladder before you decide to get surgery. Gallbladder surgery does have many complications doctors won’t tell you about. They also will probably not tell you about natural options since it might go against their ‘financial’ judgment.

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