Great Solomon’s Seal and Sweet Woodruff

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Great Solomon’s Seal and Sweet Woodruff
Symptoms of diabetes

Image by bill barber
From my set entitled “Solomon’s Seal”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607189465821/
In my collection entitled “The Garden”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760718…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Polygonatum (King Solomon’s-seal, Solomon’s Seal) is a genus of about 50 species of flowering plants within the family Ruscaceae, formerly classified in the lily family Liliaceae.
Some species of this genus have medicinal properties, and some (in particular P. sibiricum) are used as an tisane in traditional Chinese medicine, which is called dungulle in Korea.
Some Polygonatum shoots are edible, cooked like asparagus, as are the roots – after appropriate treatment – being a good source of starch
Revolving primarily around the root, "Solomon’s Seal" are traditionally used in a range of afflictions from menopause to broken bones. As a topical application, the root are said to expedite the healing of cuts and bruises, skin irritations and inflammations, and as a face wash is good for acne, blemishes and all kinds of imperfections of the skin. When consumed as a tea, it is said to alleviate a range of symptoms associated with menopause, indigestion, diabetes, broken bones, insomnia, kidney pains, and even infertility]
Its use to fight diabetes was first observed in 1930 by Langecker. After experiments, he concluded that it was effective in fighting nutritional hyperglycemia, though not that caused by adrenaline release, probably due to its content in glucokinin.

From my set entitled “Sweet Woodruff”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607217333095/
In my collection entitled “The Garden”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760718…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodruff
Woodruff (Galium odoratum) is a herbaceous perennial plant in the family Rubiaceae, native to Europe, North Africa and western Asia. It grows to 30-50 cm (12-20 ins.) long, often lying flat on the ground or supported by other plants. The plant is also known in English as Sweet Woodruff or Wild Baby’s Breath. "Master of the woods" is probably a translation of the German name Waldmeister. Names like "Sweetscented bedstraw", "Cudweed" and "Ladies’ Bedstraw" should be avoided; the former two properly refer to Galium triflorum, the latter to Galium verum.

The leaves are simple, lanceolate, glabrous, 2-5 cm long, and borne in whorls of 6-9. The small (4-7 mm diameter) flowers are produced in cymes, each white with four petals joined together at the base. The seeds are 2-4 mm diameter, produced singly, and each seed is covered in tiny hooked bristles which help disperse the seed by sticking temporarily to clothing and animal fur.

This plant prefers partial to full shade in moist, rich soils. In dry summers it needs frequent irrigation. Propagation is by crown division, separation of the rooted stems, or digging up of the barely submerged perimeter stolons.

Woodruff, as the scientific name odoratum suggests, is a strongly scented plant, the sweet scent being derived from coumarin. This scent increases on wilting and then persists on drying, and woodruff is used in pot-pourri and as a moth deterrent. It is also used, mainly in Germany, to flavour May wine (called "Maiwein" or "Maibowle" in German), beer (Berliner Weisse), brandy, sausages, jelly, jam, a soft drink (Tarhun), ice cream, and an herbal tea with gentle sedative properties.

High doses can cause headaches, due to the toxity of coumarin. Very high doses of coumarin can cause vertigo, somnolence or even central paralysis and apnoea while in a coma. Since 1981, woodruff may no longer be used as an ingredient of industrially produced drinks and foodstuffs in Germany; it has been replaced by artificial aromas and
colorings.

Buttercup and Great Solomon’s Seal
Symptoms of diabetes

Image by bill barber
From my set entitled “Solomon’s Seal”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607189465821/
In my collection entitled “The Garden”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760718…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Polygonatum (King Solomon’s-seal, Solomon’s Seal) is a genus of about 50 species of flowering plants within the family Ruscaceae, formerly classified in the lily family Liliaceae.
Some species of this genus have medicinal properties, and some (in particular P. sibiricum) are used as an tisane in traditional Chinese medicine, which is called dungulle in Korea.
Some Polygonatum shoots are edible, cooked like asparagus, as are the roots – after appropriate treatment – being a good source of starch
Revolving primarily around the root, "Solomon’s Seal" are traditionally used in a range of afflictions from menopause to broken bones. As a topical application, the root are said to expedite the healing of cuts and bruises, skin irritations and inflammations, and as a face wash is good for acne, blemishes and all kinds of imperfections of the skin. When consumed as a tea, it is said to alleviate a range of symptoms associated with menopause, indigestion, diabetes, broken bones, insomnia, kidney pains, and even infertility]
Its use to fight diabetes was first observed in 1930 by Langecker. After experiments, he concluded that it was effective in fighting nutritional hyperglycemia, though not that caused by adrenaline release, probably due to its content in glucokinin.

From my set entitled “Buttercup”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607214043026/
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/sets/72157607217763461/
In my collection entitled “The Garden”
www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760718…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranunculus

Ranunculus is a large genus of about 400 species of plants in the Ranunculaceae. It includes the buttercups, spearworts, water crowfoots and the lesser celandine (but not the greater celandine of the poppy family Papaveraceae).

They are mostly herbaceous perennials with bright yellow or white flowers (if white, still with a yellow centre); some are annuals or biennials. A few have orange or red flowers and occasionally, as in R. auricomus, petals may be absent. The petals are often highly lustrous, especially in yellow species. Buttercups usually flower in April or May but flowers may be found throughout the summer especially where the plants are growing as opportunistic colonisers, as in the case of garden weeds.

The Water crowfoots (Ranunculus subgenus Batrachium), which grow in still or running water, are sometimes treated in a separate genus Batrachium. They have two different leaf types, thread-like leaves underwater and broader floating leaves although for some species, such as R. aquatilis, a third, intermediate leaf form occurs.

Ranunculus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Hebrew Character and Small Angle Shades. Some species are popular ornamental flowers in horticulture, with many cultivars selected for large and brightly coloured flowers.

The name Ranunculus derives from the Latin words rana (frog) and ulus (little). This probably refers to many species being found near water, like frogs.

In the interior of the Pacific Northwest of the United States the buttercup is called "Coyote’s eyes" — iceyéeyenm sílu in Nez Perce and spilyaynmí áčaš in Sahaptin. In the legend Coyote was tossing his eyes up in the air and catching them again when Eagle snatched them. Unable to see, Coyote made eyes from the buttercup.

All Ranunculus species are poisonous when eaten fresh by cattle, horses, and other livestock, but their acrid taste and the blistering of the mouth caused by their poison means they are usually left uneaten. Poisoning can occur where buttercups are abundant in overgrazed fields where little other edible plant growth is left, and the animals eat them out of desperation. Symptoms include bloody diarrhea, excessive salivation, colic, and severe blistering of the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. When Ranunculus plants are handled, naturally occurring ranunculin is broken down to form protoanemonin, which is known to cause contact dermatitis in humans and care should therefore be exercised in excessive handling of the plants[1]. The toxins are degraded by drying, so hay containing dried buttercups is safe

The term sardonic (sardanios), "bitter or scornful laughter", is often cited as deriving from the name of the Sardinian plant Ranunculus sardous, known as either σαρδάνη (sardanē) or σαρδόνιον (sardonion). When eaten, it would cause the eater’s face to contort in a look resembling scorn (generally followed by death). It might also be related to σαίρω (sairō) "I grin"

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