Convergence / Daniel Coburn installation

Some cool Anxiety symptoms images:

Convergence / Daniel Coburn installation
Anxiety symptoms

Image by Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library
Physiognomy Experiment
2008-2010
Mixed Media

It is easy for many people to overlook or dismiss mental illness. In most cases, its symptoms are not visible in the outward appearance of an individual. These photographic works represent a physical manifestation of psychological or emotional pain.

Many members of my family have suffered from depression and anxiety. As a child, I watched my mother suffer from the symptoms associated with these ailments. I understand the pain and suffering that is endured, because I have experienced them first-hand. At times the symptoms of my own anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have been crippling and life-altering. Through my own experience, I have developed a great empathy for those suffering from the affliction of all types of mental illness.

I began to research the history of treatment for mental illness. Many of which provided little or no relief for the patient, and on some occasions caused further pain and suffering. This installation uses complex electrical wiring and the application of light as a metaphor for the treatment of mental illness. The audience is invited to participate.

The invention of photography generated new interest in the idea that a person’s character could be determined by examination of their physical features, or outward appearance. Hugh Welch Diamond made photographs of mental patients in the Surrey County Asylum. Some of the photographs are particularly moving and served as inspiration for this piece. Diamond’s photographs were used to capture the physiognomy of the patient and were intended to aid in treatment. My photographs were made with a large-format view camera, in much the same way that Welch made his own photographs.

Convergence / Daniel Coburn installation
Anxiety symptoms

Image by Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library
Physiognomy Experiment
2008-2010
Mixed Media

It is easy for many people to overlook or dismiss mental illness. In most cases, its symptoms are not visible in the outward appearance of an individual. These photographic works represent a physical manifestation of psychological or emotional pain.

Many members of my family have suffered from depression and anxiety. As a child, I watched my mother suffer from the symptoms associated with these ailments. I understand the pain and suffering that is endured, because I have experienced them first-hand. At times the symptoms of my own anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have been crippling and life-altering. Through my own experience, I have developed a great empathy for those suffering from the affliction of all types of mental illness.

I began to research the history of treatment for mental illness. Many of which provided little or no relief for the patient, and on some occasions caused further pain and suffering. This installation uses complex electrical wiring and the application of light as a metaphor for the treatment of mental illness. The audience is invited to participate.

The invention of photography generated new interest in the idea that a person’s character could be determined by examination of their physical features, or outward appearance. Hugh Welch Diamond made photographs of mental patients in the Surrey County Asylum. Some of the photographs are particularly moving and served as inspiration for this piece. Diamond’s photographs were used to capture the physiognomy of the patient and were intended to aid in treatment. My photographs were made with a large-format view camera, in much the same way that Welch made his own photographs.

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