130426-F-VS478-042

Some cool Symptoms of high blood pressure images:

130426-F-VS478-042
Symptoms of high blood pressure

Image by U.S. Pacific Air Forces
A member of the Indonesian Armed Forces hands Sumiyati her medication during Pacific Angel 13-2 at Yogyakarta, Indonesia, April 26, 2013. Sumiyati stopped by the clinic for symptoms related to her high blood pressure. PACANGEL is a joint and combined humanitarian assistance exercise held in various countries several times a year and includes medical, dental, optometry, engineering programs and various subject-matter expert exchanges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kia Atkins)

MEDFLAG 2010, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, September 2010
Symptoms of high blood pressure

Image by US Army Africa
MEDFLAG 10 brought together U.S. military medical specialists and their colleagues from the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC) from Sept. 6-18, 2010, in Kinshasa for professional training, exchange and partnership building, and for service to the Congolese people.

Browse through this set of photos and read reports from the exercise for a fuller picture of this annual event, which promotes stability, prosperity and peace in Africa.

MASS CASUALTY, FIRST RESPONDERS EXERCISE IS CULMINATION OF MEDFLAG 10

U.S. Army photos by Staff Sgt. Kassidy Snyder and Sgt. James D. Sims

Congolese and American medical specialists participating in MEDFLAG 10 conducted a mass casualty exercise Sept. 16 as the culminating training event of the 10-day exercise.

The exercise followed four days of humanitarian assistance to Kinshasa residents by the combined forces.

Thursday’s scenario centered on a simulated bus crash resulting in approximately 50 casualties, and highlighted Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s quick reaction force (FARDC UMIR) demonstrating their techniques and skills as first responders to a catastrophe.

“My role was to check the level of bleeding and monitor the patient’s blood pressure once they arrived,” said Ndaya Lilian, a female UMIR laboratory technician. “Outside of the military I am a specialist in child delivery, and the experience and knowledge I gained over the last few weeks will help me out tremendously in the future.”

The UMIR unit demonstrated its expertise in three areas of response: picking up of casualties, triage at the advanced medical point, and a mobile surgery hospital. The hospital included three main services: emergencies, surgery room combined with intensive care and hospitalization.

As the exercise progressed, 1st Lt. Coty Sicble, a medical administrator with the North Dakota National Guard’s 814th Army Support Medical Company based in Bismarck, gave the audience a step-by-step narration of the action taking place. Sicble described the intense preparation and execution the UMIR members demonstrated during the exercise.

After the mass casualty exercise, participants conducted a closing ceremony at the Command and Staff College in Kinshasa, where the MEDFLAG 10 exercise first began Sept. 6.

“MEDFLAG 10 has taken place and was a moment of an intense scientific, technical, social and psychological communion in perfect harmony between the American forces and FARDC respective health services,” said FARDC Surgeon General Col. Gilbert Kabanda, during the closing ceremony, Sept. 17.

As part of MEDFLAG 10, U.S. and Congolese troops worked closely together to increase the combined readiness of their medical forces to respond to humanitarian emergencies. MEDFLAG is a key program in United States efforts to partner with the government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to further the development of a professional military that is accountable to civilian authority, and provides stability and security to the people.

“We can confirm, without contradiction, that MEDFLAG 10 has achieved all its objectives assigned by both military hierarchies, American and Congolese,” said Kabanda.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG DELIVERS HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE IN KINSHASA

U.S. Army photos by Sgt. James D. Sims and Staff Sgt. Kassidy Snyder

Crowds gathered, some with pre-registered tickets in hand, others with just a hope of being seen by a healthcare professional in Kinshasa Sept. 9.

“I saw a crowd of people and asked what was going on,” said Ousmane Kalotho Mutuala, a Kinshasa resident. “When they told me it was for medical care, I immediately went and got my friend who can barely see because his eyes are so bad and came back to try and get in.”

The lines started forming hours before the humanitarian civic action site opened its doors for medical and dental care to the residents of Kinshasa. Residents that had tickets were registered in advance, ensuring they would be seen on a certain date. Even though some residents, like Mutuala, did not have tickets, medical providers saw them.

“Unfortunately there is a much bigger demand then what we have assets for,” said Maj. Curt Kroh of Washburn, N.D., a physician assistant with the North Dakota National Guard’s 814th Army Support Medical Company, which is based in Bismarck. “However, we stayed until we ran out of time and material.”

Kroh is taking part in MEDFLAG 10, a joint medical exercise that allows U.S. military medical personnel and their Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC) counterparts to work side by side while providing humanitarian assistance to Kinshasa residents.

Approximately 25 FARDC and U.S. medical and dental personnel, and an additional 50 support staff, provided services. Over a four-day period, FARDC and U.S. medical personnel provided assistance to approximately 2,000 Congolese.

Patients were treated for various illnesses ranging from high blood pressure to malaria. The most common problem encountered was residents with eye problems, because they have never been examined, said Kroh. In addition to medical attention, dentists provided care ranging from basic oral hygiene to tooth extraction.

“The bulk of the medical care that was provided in the exam rooms was by FARDC doctors,” said Kroh. “The FARDC doctors are very well involved in the treatment of the local population.”

While all residents could not be seen and all problems could not be treated, residents were entered into the medical system and given referral letters for follow-up care.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

AIR FORCE DENTISTS TRAIN WITH CONGOLESE PEERS, RENDER ASSISTANCE TO KINSHASA RESIDENTS

U.S. Army photos by Sgt. James D. Sims

Taking a vacation or going home for the holidays brings to mind a picture of having fun and spending time with family.

However, for family members of embassy staff, a trip back to Europe or the United States means finally having the opportunity to visit the dentist — at least until this week.

“It’s been about two years that I’ve been trying to get to the dentist,” said Kathryn Anne Crowder, a family member of an embassy worker in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo. “So this is a much needed visit.”

Crowder was one of about 35 patients seen by three Air Force Reserve dentists visiting the DRoC as part of MEDFLAG 10, an annual joint medical training exercise that allows U.S. military service members to work side by side with their African counterparts. In addition to training, the joint forces also provide humanitarian and civic assistance to local residents.

“Working with the local population has given us the feeling we are reaching those that really need it,” said Lt. Col. Jacqueline Garcia-Castellanos of Miami, a member of the 482nd Aeromedical Dental Squadron, based at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla.

Both American and Congolese dental professionals spent several days in classroom training reviewing the necessity of basic oral hygiene and preventive care before providing assistance to Kinshasa residents.

Medical and dental staff will assess roughly 2,000 cases and provide the necessary care to Congolese citizens during a four-day period of the exercise.

“The experience has been quite enlightening,” said Garcia-Castellanos. “It has given us the opportunity to engage in active dental care side by side with the Congolese army dental corps, and the exchange has been excellent.”

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

ILLINOIS CHAPLAINS FIND COMMON GROUND WITH PEERS IN KINSHASA, PAY VISIT TO WELCOMING CHURCH

U.S. Army photos by Staff Sgt. Kassidy L Snyder.

Three and a half years to build; more than 6,000 members; completely debt free — a church is built by the people for the people.

“This church is the fruit of the sacrifices of our people,” said Guy-Roger Dang, associate pastor at Centre Evangelique La Resurrection in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

The two-story church standing in the middle of Kinshasa will celebrate the one-year anniversary of its opening in December.

Illinois National Guard Chaplain (Col.) Daniel Krumrei, along with chaplain assistant Sgt. 1st Class David Penny, were welcomed by the pastor and his congregation as they made a visit of goodwill.

“We are very happy and encouraged to see people of other countries come to visit our church,” said Dang.

The church proudly displays multiple flags on its altar to signify the different countries of its visitors.

Krumrei of Springfield, Ill., and Penny of Buckley, Ill., are in Africa with MEDFLAG 10, a joint medical exercise aimed at providing humanitarian assistance to the Congolese people. The chaplain and his assistant’s primary mission is to take care of service members involved in the exercise, both personally and spiritually.

In addition to supporting U.S. service members, the ministry team is engaging with chaplains of the Armed Forces of Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC). “Our Congolese counterparts showed special interests in discussing areas of trauma, family care and post-traumatic stress,” Krumrei said.

The Illinois National Guard ministry team is conducting a three-day workshop with FARDC chaplains, aimed at bringing peace within the country and to the people, he said.

This is the first visit to Africa for the ministry team; however, the mission is a familiar one. Krumrei has been a chaplain for more than 25 years and visited ,many countries. “Each mission is a privilege, and it is important to understand our similarities and differences so we can work together to accomplish the overall mission,” Krumrei said.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG 2010 SKILLS EXCHANGE SEPT. 10, 2010

Approximately 40 U.S. service members shared medical techniques and procedures with their Congolese counterparts Friday at the Command and Staff College in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, as part of MEDFLAG 10.

“We are showing them how we approach patient care, giving them pointers and seeing what we can do to help improve and fine tune their skills,” said Sgt. Stuart Hammer of Mandan, N.D., a combat medic with the 814th Army Support Medical Company, Detachment 1, based in Grand Forks.

U.S. service members are exchanging medical techniques with the Armed Forces of Democratic Republic of Congo Immediate Response Unit (FARDC UMIR) and medics, who are the Congolese military’s first responders to disasters.

“We taught classes on malaria, tuberculosis, infectious diseases, parasites, and hypertension,” all subjects related to tropical Africa, said Capt. Itofe-Engulu Desire, a 16-year veteran doctor with FARDC.

Classes led by U.S. service members included arriving at the scene of an incident, assessing casualties, and treating and preparing patients for transport. The 814th brought training aids, including a U.S. Army issued medic bag and moulage, modeling material used to devise mock injuries for added realism.

Pvt. 2nd Class Ndalaga-Sango Augustino, a nurse with the FARDC UMIR, said the U.S. medics taught her and her fellow soldiers about battlefield evacuation procedures, while the UMIR practitioners taught the Americans different techniques for bandaging patients. The exchange of techniques was beneficial to both groups, she said.

“We’ve shared a lot of good ideas and have gotten some techniques from them that I never would have thought of, such as different patient carries and bandaging of patients,” said Spc. Ricky Smith of Fargo, a combat medic with Detachment 1.

The battery of classes is leading up to a mass casualty exercise that will take place Sept. 16, in which the FARDC UMIR soldiers will demonstrate how their disaster response operations.

The UMIR’s Company 3 responded to the oil tanker truck that overturned in the eastern Congo in July, bursting into flames killing at least 230 and injuring more than 200. The UMIR soldiers are anxious to show their countrymen their skills and how, with better equipment and more trained soldiers, they would be able to better treat casualties in the event of a similar disaster, said Smith.

“In the end, we hope they can gain anything that makes them more adequate at saving lives,” said 1st Lt. Coty Sicble of Bismarck, a medical administrator with the 814th based in Bismarck.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG 10 KICKS OFF WITH OPENING CEREMONY IN KINSHASA, 6 Sept., 2010

U.S. Armed Forces along with the Armed Forces of Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC) held an opening ceremony Sept. 6 at the Command and Staff College in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, to signify the start of MEDFLAG 10, a joint medical exercise.

“Today and throughout the exercise, we gather together as military personnel and civilians working together in the spirit of friendship and cooperation,” said Lt. Col. Todd Johnston, the MEDFLAG 10 U.S. forces task force commander. “It is inspiring to look back at where we have come from and look forward to where we are going.”

The ceremony began with the arrival of distinguished guests, including Luzolo Bambi, Minister of Justice and Human Rights for the Democratic Republic of Congo; Charge d’ Affaires Samuel Laeuchli; Maj. Gen. Marcelin Lukama, FARDC Chief of Defense Forces; and Col. Gilbert Kabanda, FARDC surgeon general.

The FARDC military police presented honors while the FARDC music battalion performed both countries’ national anthems.

“It is my hope that our respective national organizations will learn something about each other as they work together over the coming weeks,” said Luzolo. “In the end, it is about saving lives and minimizing human suffering in the event of a disaster.”

Following the opening ceremony, U.S. medical personnel began classroom instruction with the FARDC on familiarization of malaria signs, symptoms, causes and treatments. Both armed forces will continue classroom instruction on various medical topics for the next four days. After all classroom instruction is completed both forces will work side by side to provide humanitarian assistance to Congolese citizens.

MEDFLAG 10 will conclude Sept. 18.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

MEDFLAG PREPARES FOR TAKE OFF SEPT. 6, 2010

Participants arrived in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo and began to prepare for MEDFLAG 10, a joint medical exercise focused on humanitarian assistance that will take place Sept. 6-18 in Kinshasa.

MEDFLAG 10 is the latest in a series of exercises involving U.S. military forces and partner militaries in Africa with the aim of establishing and developing military interoperability, regional relationships, synchronization of effort and capacity building.

“As we approach the culmination of months of strenuous preparation on both our parts, we look forward to the beginning of a successful exercise and ongoing efforts with the Congolese forces,” said Lt. Col. Todd Johnston, MEDFLAG 10 Task Force Commander for U.S. forces.

Approximately 100 U.S. military personnel and 250 Congolese military personnel will work together to increase the combined readiness of their medical forces to respond to humanitarian emergencies.

“When working on the same objective it is important to have the same procedures,” said Col. Gilbert Kabanda, the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo Surgeon General. “Without uniformity it is hard to reach our goal.”

MEDFLAG is an annual medical exercise that brings together U.S. military personnel with counterparts from militaries throughout Africa. MEDFLAG was initiated in 1987 as a U.S. European Command-sponsored, bilateral medical exercise to facilitate an exchange of medical information and techniques with militaries in Africa. In 2009, the MEDFLAG exercise transitioned to AFRICOM oversight.

Congolese forces participating in the exercise include the Unit Medical Immediate Response of the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

U.S. forces participating in the exercise include U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM); U.S. Army Africa; U.S. Marine Corps; 5th Signal Brigade; 21st Theater Sustainment Command; 139th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Illinois Army National Guard; 349th and 482nd Aeromedical Dental Squadrons; 404th Civil Affairs; 409th Contracting; 814th Medical Company, North Dakota Army National Guard; 772nd Civil Support Team; the 943rd
and 940th Aeromedical Dental Flights; and Naval Reserve Support Activity, New Orleans Team; and the 943rd and 940th Aeromedical Dental Flights.

Previous MEDFLAG exercises have taken place in Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Gabon, Georgia Republic, Ghana, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Romania, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho and Malawi.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official Vimeo video channel: www.vimeo.com/usarmyafrica

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *

*


*

Du kannst folgende HTML-Tags benutzen: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>